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The SAD PERSONS scale is an acronym utilized as a mnemonic device. It was first developed as a clinical assessment tool for medical students to determine suicide risk, by Patterson et al.[1] The Adapted-SAD PERSONS Scale was developed by Gerald A. Juhnke for use with children in 1996.

CalculationEdit

The score is calculated from ten yes/no questions, with one point for each affirmative answer:

  • S: Male sex
  • A: Older age
  • D: Depression
  • P: Previous attempt
  • E: Ethanol abuse
  • R: Rational thinking loss
  • S: Social supports lacking
  • O: Organized plan
  • N: No spouse
  • S: Sickness

This score is then mapped onto a risk assessment scale as follows:

0–4 Low
5–6 Medium
7–10 High

Modified SAD PERSONS Scale Edit

[2]

The score is calculated from ten yes/no questions, with points given for each affirmative answer as follows:

  • S: Male sex → 1
  • A: Age <19 or >45 years → 1
  • D: Depression or hopelessness → 2
  • P: Previous suicidal attempts or psychiatric care → 1
  • E: Excessive ethanol or drug use → 1
  • R: Rational thinking loss (psychotic or organic illness) → 2
  • S: Single, widowed or divorced → 1
  • O: Organized or serious attempt → 2
  • N: No social support → 1
  • S: Stated future intent (determined to repeat or ambivalent) → 2

This score is then mapped onto a risk assessment scale as follows:

  • 0–5: May be safe to discharge (depending upon circumstances)
  • 6-8: Probably requires psychiatric consultation
  • >8: Probably requires hospital admission

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Patterson; Dohn; Patterson (April 1983). Evaluation of suicidal patients: the SAD PERSONS scale.. PMID 6867245.
  2. Oxford Handbook of Emergency Medicine. Third Edition. Page 609.
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