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File:Restraint chair used for enteral feeding -b.jpg

Mohammad Ahmed Abdullah Saleh Al Hanashi was a long term hunger striker, who was fed through a nasal tube, after being immobilized in a restraint chair until shortly before his death.

File:Force-feeding kit.jpg

A Guantanamo force-feeding kit.

Mohammad Ahmed Abdullah Saleh Al Hanashi (February 1, 1978 - June 1, 2009) was a citizen of Yemen, held in extrajudicial detention in the United States Guantanamo Bay detainment camps, in Cuba.[1] Al Hanashi's Guantanamo Internment Serial Number was 78. The Department of Defense reports that Al Hanashi was born on February 1, 1978, in Al Habrub, Yemen.

On June 2 2009, the Department of Defense reported that a 31 year-old Yemeni captive named "Muhammed Ahmad Abdallah Salih" committed suicide late on June 1 2009.[2][3][4] Camp officials did not allow journalists who were at the camp for Omar Khadr's Guantanamo military commission to report news of his death until they left Guantanamo.

Guantanamo Medical records

On 16 March 2007 the Department of Defense published medical records for the captives.[5][6]

June 2009 death

File:Guantanamo captive psych ward.jpg

David Remes reports that Mohammad Ahmed was being held in the same psychiatric ward as his client Adnan Latif.

File:Colonel Bruce Vargo and Admiral David Thomas.jpg

Binyam Mohammed told reporters that Saleh had been chosen as the prisoners' representative to camp authorities, and that he was called to a January 17 2009 meeting with Admiral David Thomas, commander of Joint Task Force Guantanamo, and Colonel Bruce Vargo, Commander of the camp's guard force, and that Saleh never returned to Camp five, and instead was confined to the camp's Psychiatric wing, where he died.

Ahmed was reported to have been found "unresponsive" in his cell late on the night of June 1 2009.[2][3][4] He is reported to have been held in Camp 5, and to have been held in the Guantanamo psychiatric ward. Like all the other men camp authorities claimed were suicides he was on a long term hunger strike, and, consequently, where he was being strapped twice a day into a restraint chair, for force-feeding. The Associated Press reports that his weight had, at one time, dropped to just 86 pounds.

David Remes said that he believed Ahmed had gone without legal representation until a few weeks ago, but that his lawyers hadn't yet had a chance to visit him.[3]

On June 3 2009 Guantanamo spokesman Lieutenant Commander Brook DeWalt asserted that Mohammed Ahmad was no longer hunger striking at the time of his death, that he had abandoned his hunger strike in "mid-May".[7][8] According to David McFadden, reporting for the Associated Press wrote:

The military has refused to reveal how they believe Mohammad Ahmed Abdullah Saleh Al-Hanashi died in his cell, other than saying it was an apparent suicide.

DeWalt declined to confirm or refute whether Mohammad Ahmed had been in Guantanamo's Psychiatric unit, and said he didn't know whether he had made previous suicide attempts.[7]

Khalid al-Kathiri, a Yemeni diplomat, traveled to Guantanamo to oversee how the remains were treated.[7] The Miami Herald reported that the Miami Coroner's office had also dispatched an observer.[8]

On June 5 2009 Saleh's body was returned to Yemen.[9] According to the Associated Press Jose Ruiz, a Guantanamo spokesmen, said that the Navy will not make the results of his autopsy public until the Navy Criminal Investigative Service completes its investigation.[10]

On June 11 2009 Andrew O. Selsky, of the Associated Press, published an article based on interviews with former captives who knew Saleh.[11] Recently released Binyam Mohammed asserted that suicide was totally out of character for Saleh: "He was patient and encouraged others to be the same. He never viewed suicide as a means to end his despair."

Mohammed said that Saleh had been chosen as a prisoner's representative.[11] Mohammed said that Saleh had been escorted from Camp five on January 17 2009 for a meeting with Admiral David Thomas, commander of Joint Task Force Guantanamo, and Colonel Bruce Vargo, Commander of the camp's guard force. Mohammed said that Saleh never returned to Camp five, and instead was confined to the camp's Psychiatric wing.

Selsky reported that Elizabeth Gilson the attorney for one of the other captives confined to the psychiatric wing, was aware of details of Saleh's death, which she could not disclose because they were classified.[11]

On August 1 2009 Mike Melia, of the Associated Press reported that, Mohammed Albasha, a Yemeni official said that US authorities had informed the Yemen government that Al Hanashi died of "asphyxiation".[12] The Associated Press quoted fellow captives Yasin Qasem Muhammad Ismail and Adnan Latif, who said Al Hanashi weight had dropped to under 45 kilograms prior to his death, and that he could only get around on crutches.

Template:CSRT-No[13]

Template:ARB

A Summary of Evidence memo was prepared for Mohammed Ahmed Abdullah Saleh Al Hanashi annual Administrative Review Board on April 18, 2005.[14][15] The following primary factors favor continued detention

a. Commitment
  1. The detainee traveled from Yemen to Afghanistan in March or April 2001. He traveled to Afghanistan (AF) from Yemen via air to Dubai, United Arab Emirates (TC) and Karachi, Pakistan (PK); bus to Quetta, PK and Kandahar, AF, then taxi to Kabul, AF.
  2. The detainee did not have money to obtain a passport. Sa'ed paid for the detainee's passport, airline tickets and obtained the visas.
  3. Sa'ed facilitated travel from Yemen to Afghanistan and subsequently served as a front line commander in the front lines north of Kabul. Sa'ed held a position subordinate to Abdel Hadi Al-Iraqi Template:Sic.
  4. The detainee stayed at both Taliban and Jama Tablique Template:Sic guesthouses while en route to Kabul, Afghanistan.
  5. Jama'at Al Tablighi is a Pakistan-based Islamic missionary organization used as a cover to mask travel and activities of terrorists, including members of al Qaida.
  6. The detainee joined the Taliban while in Afghanistan.
  7. The detainee fought on the front lines against the Northern Alliance.
b. Training
  1. Ghailani identified the detainee as being present at the al-Faruq Training Camp in Afghanistan where he underwent basic training in 1998 to 1999 before moving on to the front lines in Kabul, Afghanistan.
  2. Ghailani is a Tanzanian al-Qaida operative who has been indicted in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania.
c. Connection/Associations
  1. The detainee was associated with a high level al Qaida commander, Abdul Hadi Al-Iraqi Template:Sic.
  2. Abd al-Hadi al-Iraqi Template:Sicwas a veteran Afghan fighter who was the head of the Kabul, Afghanistan Khan Ghulam Bashah, guesthouse named Khan Ghulam Bashah and who later took charge of the Northern front in Kabul in 2000.
  3. The detainee fought under the leadership of Abdul Salam.
  4. Abdul Salaam was one of the leaders at the Kabul front during the fighting with the Northern Alliance. He was also in charge of mine clearing operations.
  5. Detainee's name was found on a document listing 324 Arabic names, aliases and nationalities recovered from a safe house associated with suspected al-Qaida in Karachi, Pakistan.
  6. Usama Bin Laden spoke to the detainee's group while they were in Tora Bora.
d. Other Relevant Data
  1. The detainee was captured at Mazar-e-Sharif Template:Sic.
  2. The detainee was captured with 400 U.S. dollars. Mu'Amar Sa'ed Dayan, aka Jabir, gave the detainee his wallet before he died. Inside the wallet was Dayan's last will and 400 U.S. dollars.


The following primary factors favor release or transfer

a. The detainee readily admits to having fought for the Taliban, but noted that it was never his intention or desire to fight against the U.S.
b. The detainee affirmed he had never seen Usama Bin Laden and that he had never been to Tora Bora as previously stated.
c. The detainee advised he was not trained on weapons in Afghanistan as he already knew how to operate a Kalishnakov Template:Sic (AK-47) and how to handle hand grenades when he lived in Yemen.
d. The detainee considers himself devout, but added that he is not a religious fanatic.
e. The detainee denies any involvement with al Qaida.


Transcript

Al Hanashi chose not to participate in his Administrative Review Board hearing.[16] The DoD released a transcript of two pages of formalities from the brief unclassified portion of his hearing.

Second annual Administrative Review Board

A Summary of Evidence memo was prepared for Mohammed Ahmed Abdullah Saleh Al Hanashi annual Administrative Review Board on March 2, 2006.[17] The four page memo listed twenty-three "primary factors favor[ing] continued detention" and eight "primary factors favor[ing] release or transfer".

The following primary factors favor continued detention

a. Commitment
  1. The detainee obtained a cassette tape of a famous Sheik that stated that all Muslims needed to visit Afghanistan because it was perfect for Islam and is the most pure State.
  2. The detainee concluded from the cassette tape that Afghanistan was more of an Islamic society than Yemen.
  3. The detainee immediately decided to go to Afghanistan but had no money to fund his trip. The detainee met a man who gave the detainee money to buy a passport and completely took care of the rest of the trip.
  4. An associate of the detainee was actively looking for a way to get into Chechnya to join the jihad. In Yemen, the associate worked assisting Yemeni men traveling to Afghanistan for training. The associate served as a senior leader at the front lines North of Kabul. The associate later became a well known person in his role as a front line Commander.
  5. The detainee stated that his passport contained the name of Mohammed Ahmed Abdullah Saleh and not his family tribal name of Al Hanashi. The detainee did not tell his parents that he was leaving for Afghanistan.
  6. The detainee traveled from Yemen in March or April of 2001. The detainee traveled to Afghanistan from Yemen via air to Dubai, United Arab Emirates and Karachi, Pakistan, traveled by bus to Quetta, Pakistan and Kandahar, Afghanistan and then took a taxi to Kabul.
  7. The detainee stayed in a Taliban guesthouse for two or three days in Quetta, before taking a bus to the border.
  8. The detainee rode the bus with a number of Taliban and Jama Tablique members, and stayed in a Jama Tablique house for two to three days and then stayed at a guesthouse called the Dafter Taliban House.
  9. Jama at Al Tablighi is a Pakistan based Islamic missionary organization used as a cover to mask travel and activities of terrorist, including members of al Qaida.
  10. Upon the detainee's arrival in Kabul, the detainee stayed in another Taliban house called Darol Alaman House, where he became aware that he would be fighting against the Northern Alliance.
  11. The detainee left home and went to Afghanistan fully intending to fight for the Taliban and die for his God.
  12. The detainee was deployed for six months to the Northern front to fight against the Northern Alliance.
  13. The detainee stated that he fired at the enemy but did not kill anyone.
b. Training
The detainee stated that he was not trained on weapons in Afghanistan because he already knew how to operate a Kalishnikov and how to handle hand grenades from when he lived in Yemen.
c. Connections/Associations
  1. The detainee saw Usama bin Laden in Tora Bora. Usama bin Laden spoke to the detainee's group for three to four minutes.
  2. While fighting for the Taliban, the detainee was under the leadership of Abdul Salam and saw Abdul Hadi Al Araqi whom the detainee describes as the General of the non Afghan Taliban troops positioned on the front line.
  3. The detainee's name and aliases appear on a document listing 324 Arabic names and nationalities recovered from safehouse raids associated with suspected al Qaida in Karachi, Pakistan.
d. Other Relevant Data
  1. The detainee traveled with a group of 450 in Taliban trucks to Herat, Afghanistan to surrender and discard their weapons in exchange for their safety. The detainee and a total of 5,000 Taliban soldiers surrendered to the Northern Alliance.
  2. The detainee was captured with a Kalishnakov Template:Sic.
  3. The detainee had in his possession $400 United States Dollars when he was captured in Pakistan. The detainee claimed Sa ed Dayan gave him his wallet before he died. Inside the wallet was $400 United States Dollars and Dayan's will.
  4. The detainee readily admitted to having fought with the Taliban, but noted that it was never his intention or desire to fight against the United States.
  5. During an uprising following his capture, the detainee was wounded in his left hand and right side of his adbdomen by the gunfire. The detainee fell to the ground and lay there while the guards were shooting everyone around him.
  6. The detainee was treated for his wounds at Shabraghan Prison and that he spent four days there before being transported to a hospital in the town of Shabraghan for further treatment. The detainee spent approximately 25 days at the hospital before being transported by Americans to the prison in Kandahar for one and a half months. After Kandahar, the detainee was transported to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.


The following primary factors favor release or transfer

a. The detainee made the decision to go to Afghanistan with the idea of exploring the culture and country to see if Afghanistan was a true Islamic State and had no intentions of going to Afghanistan to fight.
'b. The detainee stated that he has heard of the al Farouq Training Camp for Arabs but has never attended the Camp and does not know anyone who has trained at the Camp.
c. The detainee claimed that the Taliban forced him to be a soldier and claimed that he did not support the Taliban but was unable to leave.
d. The detainee stated that he not take a Bayat or oath.
e. The detainee cleared up a discrepancy in an earlier interview conducted on 3 September and on 13 September 2002 that he saw Usama bin Laden for three to four minutes in Tora Bora, when Usama bin Laden talked to his group. The detainee corrected his previous statements and advised that he never saw Usama bin Laden and that he had never been to Tora Bora.
f. The detainee was unaware of anyone involved in the attack of the U.S.S. COLE or anyone associated with any terrorist acts.
g. The detainee denied having any knowledge of the attacks in the United States prior to their execution of 11 September 2001. The detainee also denied knowledge of any rumors or plans of future attacks on the United States or United States interests.
h. When the detainee gets released, he hopes to go back to Yemen and get married. Once married, the detainee intends to go to school and become a history or geography teacher.


See also

References

  1. OARDEC (2006-05-15). "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006". United States Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/news/May2006/d20060515%20List.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-29.
  2. 2.0 2.1 David McFadden, Danica Coto (2009-06-02). "Military: Gitmo detainee dies of apparent suicide". Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fhostednews%2Fap%2Farticle%2FALeqM5hVbNZcN5Ks9DDeoPRHAwXW576ClwD98IPSG01&date=2009-06-02.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 David McFadden, Danica Coto (2009-06-02). "Military: Gitmo detainee dies of apparent suicide". Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2009-05-25. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fhostednews%2Fap%2Farticle%2FALeqM5hVbNZcN5Ks9DDeoPRHAwXW576ClwD98IR8SO0&date=2009-06-02. "'Salih was being force-fed in a restraint chair; the other six surviving inmates are being force-fed from bed,' Remes said, adding that he didn't think the Yemeni had any legal representation until two lawyers arrived in February. 'They were due to see him for the first time in a couple of weeks,' he said."
  4. 4.0 4.1 "U.S: Gitmo detainee dies of apparent suicide". MSNBC. 2009-06-02. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.msnbc.msn.com%2Fid%2F31069767%2F&date=2009-06-02.
  5. JTF-GTMO (2007-03-16). "Measurements of Heights and Weights of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba". Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/measurements/. Retrieved 2008-12-22. mirror
  6. JTF-GTMO (2006-03-16). "Heights, weights, and in-processing dates". Department of Defense. Archived from the original on 2008-12-25. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fhumanrights.ucdavis.edu%2Freports%2Fheights-weights-and-in-processing-dates&date=2008-12-25. Retrieved 2008-12-25.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 David McFadden (2009-06-03). "Military: Detainee who died not on hunger strike". Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2009-06-04. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fhostednews%2Fap%2Farticle%2FALeqM5hVbNZcN5Ks9DDeoPRHAwXW576ClwD98JIJQ01&date=2009-06-04.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Carol Rosenberg (2009-06-03). "Military still quiet on suicide of Yemeni Guantánamo detainee". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 2009-06-06. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.miamiherald.com%2Fnews%2Famericas%2Fguantanamo%2Fstory%2F1080361.html&date=2009-06-06. Retrieved 2009-06-04.
  9. Carol Rosenberg (2009-06-05). "Dead detainee sent from Guantánamo to native Yemen". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 2009-06-06. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.miamiherald.com%2Fnews%2Famericas%2Fguantanamo%2Fstory%2F1083411.html&date=2009-06-06. Retrieved 2009-06-05.
  10. Mike Melia (2009-06-05). "US returns body of Guantanamo detainee to Yemen". Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2009-06-06. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fhostednews%2Fap%2Farticle%2FALeqM5hVbNZcN5Ks9DDeoPRHAwXW576ClwD98KJAV80&date=2009-06-06. Retrieved 2009-06-05.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Andrew Selsky (2009-06-11). "Gitmo fatality had been prisoners' representative". Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2009-06-12. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fhostednews%2Fap%2Farticle%2FALeqM5gW750JBkev6o2WsII3K4_kVfCbYwD98ONRAG1&date=2009-06-12.
  12. Mike Melia (2009-08-01). "Yemeni official: Gitmo inmate died of asphyxiation". Associated Press. http://abcnews.go.com/International/wirestory?id=8229664&page=1. Retrieved 2010-10-04.[dead link]
  13. [[[:Template:DoD detainees ARB]] Summarized transcripts (.pdf)], from Mohammad Ahmed Abdullah Saleh Al Hanashi'sCombatant Status Review Tribunal - pages 55-56
  14. OARDEC (2005-04-18). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Hanashi, Mohammed Ahmed Abdullah Saleh". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 81–82. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/ARB_Round_1_Factors_001046-001160.pdf#81. Retrieved 2006.
  15. OARDEC (2005-04-18). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Hanashi, Mohammed Ahmed Abdullah Saleh". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 81–83. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/ARB_Round_1_Factors_001046-001160.pdf#81-83. Retrieved 2009-01-30.
  16. OARDEC (date redacted). [[[:Template:DoD detainees ARB]] "Summary of Administrative Review Proceedings for ISN 078"]. United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 201–202. Template:DoD detainees ARB. Retrieved 2009-01-30.
  17. OARDEC (2006-03-02). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Al Hanashi, Mohammed Ahmed Abdullah Saleh". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 54–57. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/ARB_Round_2_Factors_100-199.pdf#54-57. Retrieved 2008-09-28.

External links


fr:Mohammed Ahmad Abdallah Salih al-Hanashi

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