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The following is a list of religious slurs that are, or have been, used as insinuations or allegations about adherents of a given religion or to refer to them in a derogatory (critical or disrespectful), pejorative (disapproving or contemptuous) or insulting manner.

Bead Mumbler (also Bead Rattler)- derogatory term for Roman Catholics, referring to prayer with a rosary

Bible basher 
(UK, Australia & New Zealand) derogatory term used to describe a Protestant, particularly one from a Pentecostal or fundamentalist denomination who believes in the fundamentalist authority of the Bible, also commonly used universally against Christians who are perceived to go out of their way to force their faith upon others..[citation needed]
Bible thumper 
(U.S.) derogatory term used to describe a Protestant, particularly one from a Pentecostal or fundamentalist denomination who believes in the fundamentalist authority of the Bible, also commonly used universally against Christians who are perceived to go out of their way to force their faith upon others.[citation needed]
Burkha Boy 
(NZ, chiefly north island) derogatory term used to describe a Muslim male.
Campbellite 
Potentially derogatory term for an individual in any part of the Restoration Movement associated with Thomas and Alexander Campbell
Church of Christer 
Potentially disparaging term for a member of the Churches of Christ or the Independent Christian Churches/Churches of Christ
Clam, clamhead 
derogatory terms for a Scientologist, from a passage about clam engrams in L. Ron Hubbard's 1952 book, What To Audit, later renamed The History Of Man.[1]
Fundie, fundy 
(US and some other English-speaking countries) religious fundamentalist, particularly Christian fundamentalists.[citation needed]
Fenian 
(UK) Derogatory term for an Irish Roman Catholic.
Happy Clapper, Happy-Clappy 
(AUS/ SA) derogatory term similar to Bible Basher, used to describe a Protestant, particularly one from a Pentecostal or fundamentalist denomination who believes in the fundamentalist authority of the Bible, and the manner in which they clap, sing and celebrate during their church services.[citation needed]
Holy Roller 
(US) ritualistic Protestants prone to shaking (Shakers), rolling on the floor, suffering from fits or "speaking in tongues" (Pentecostals during worship or prayer). The term holy roller, however, is applied to some Evangelical Protestants, especially charismatics, if they are vocal about their own religious views or critical of individuals who do not meet their moral standards. Similar to Bible Thumper. An example is Aunt Esther in the television sitcom Sanford & Son.[2]
Hun 
(Scotland, Northern Ireland) - derogatory term for a Protestant, especially supporters of the team Rangers , a traditionally Protestant club of the Scottish Premier League.[3]
Irvingite 
a member of the Catholic Apostolic Church — often taken to be offensive [Edward Irving died 1834 Scottish clergyman + -ite][4] May also refer to members of the Old Apostolic Church and New Apostolic Church.
JAP 
Jewish-American Princess
Jack Mormon 
(Western U.S.) a. a non-faithful LDS person, b. a non-Mormon.[5]
Jesus freak 
(U.S.) A member of some Christian movements
Kike 
A Jewish person.
Left-footer 
(Northern Ireland) (West of Scotland) Catholic (Northern Ireland)[6] (Lancashire) Used by Protestants to describe Catholics or a supporter of Celtic F.C.. From the myth in Glasgow that Irish Catholic labourers pushed spades into the ground their left foot and kicked footballs with the left foot. It is also used in south Cork to describe Protestants.
Left-legger 
Used in the Republic of Ireland to describe a Protestant, usually from Northern Ireland. It is usually considered offensive, as it derives from a person who is a "leftie", in other words, unusual.
Mackerel Snapper 
or Mackerel Snapper, is a sectarian slur for Roman Catholics, originating in the U.S. in the 1850s and referring to the pre-Vatican II custom of Friday abstinence.[7] The Friday abstinence from meat (red meat and poultry) distinguished Catholics from other Christians, especially in North America, where Protestant churches prevailed and Catholics tended to be poor immigrants from Italy and Ireland.
Marrano 
(Spain) a Jewish convert to Christianity, usually for social and not spiritual reasons; derives from the Inquisition; today, can be used to describe a Jew who marries a Catholic. Can also be called a Converso. (It is also a Latin American Spanish slang synonym for "dirty pig" or swine.)[8]
Molly Mormon 
The opposite of a Jack Mormon; a female Mormon who is strict and rigorously follows the Church's rules, even more so than average Mormons. Also, a Mormon from Utah.[citation needed]
Mussie or Muzzie 
A term used to reference a Muslim. Not strictly a pejorative.
Orangie 
(Ireland/UK) a derogatory term for pro-British Ulster Protestants (referring to supporters of the Orange Order).[9]
Papist 
(Northern Ireland and Scottish Protestants) a Roman Catholic person — usually Irish Catholic. Used in the movie Mississippi Burning.[10]
Peter Priesthood 
Male version of a Molly Mormon.
Popeblower 
a devout Catholic.
Prod, proddy dog 
(AUS Catholics (particularly school kids)) term for Protestants, particularly rival kids from Protestant schools. "Proddywhoddy" and "proddywoddy" are used in children's school rhymes in Cork.[11]
Russellite 
one of the Jehovah's Witnesses (Charles Taze Russell died 1916 American religious leader + -ite Also: Walkie-Talkie :(South Africa)- due to the fact that they walk from door to door speaking to householders about their belief's)[12]
Soup-taker 
(Ireland) A person who has sold out their beliefs, referring to the Irish Potato famine when some Catholics converted to a Protestant faith in order to gain access to a free meal.[13]
Swaddler
(Ireland) - a Protestant. "(...)So we walked on, the ragged troop screaming after us: 'Swaddlers! Swaddlers!' thinking that we were Protestants" (James Joyce, "An Encounter", part of "Dubliners", depicting daily life in Dublin around the turn the 20th Century.
Taig 
a. (Northern Ireland Protestants) a Catholic, from Tadhg, Irish for Timothy. b. (England) obsolete: an Irishman.[14]
Tim
(Northern Ireland, Scotland) derogatory term for a Catholic, especially supporters of the Celtic football team, a traditionally Catholic club of the Scottish Premier League
Towel Head
- derogatory term for a Muslim

See also

References

Template:Ibid

  1. Operation Clambake clam FAQ
  2. "roller, n1", definition 17b, The Oxford English Dictionary (account required for online access). See also the sermon "Why I Am a Holy-Roller" by William Marrion Branham, August 1953.
  3. Weldon, Victoria (2008-10-24). "You're hun-der arrest | The Sun |Home Scotland|Scottish News". Thescottishsun.co.uk. http://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/scotsol/homepage/news/article1848719.ece. Retrieved 2010-11-01.
  4. "Irvingite." Webster's [Accessed 12 March 2006].
  5. Spears, "Jack"
  6. Share, op. cit. p. 189.
  7. The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English p. 1250 (2005 Taylor & Francis)
  8. Ibid. p. 635.
  9. Share, op. cit. p. 231.
  10. Simpson, "papist" op. cit.; Share, op. cit. p. 237.
  11. Share, op. cit. p. 253.
  12. "russellite." Ibid. [12 March 2006].
  13. Hughes, "Ireland" p. 78
  14. Simpson, "teague", op. cit.
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