IMPORTANT:This page has used Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia in either a refactored, modified, abridged, expanded, built on or 'straight from' text content! (view authors)


Template:USgovtPOV Template:Cleanup-rewrite Abdullah Al Tayabi is a citizen of Saudi Arabia who was held in extrajudicial detention in the United States Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.[1] Al Tayabi's Guantanamo Internment Serial Number was 332. American intelligence analysts estimate that Al Tayabi was born in 1980, in Halban Saudi Arabia.

Abdullah al Tayabi was captured near the Pakistan-Afghan border in November 2001 and transferred to Saudi Arabia on July 15, 2007.[2]

Combatant Status Review

A Summary of Evidence memo was prepared for his tribunal. The memo listed the following allegations against him:[2]

a. The detainee is associated with forces engaged in hostilities with the United States or its coalition partners.
  1. The detainee, a Saudi Arabian citizen, voluntarily traveled from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to Afghanistan via Dubai, UAE and Karachi, Pakistan, in August 2001.
  2. The detainee received weapons framing at the Al-Farouq training camp.
  3. The detainee received familiarization with the Kalashnikov rifle and a pistol at a house in which he stayed in Kandahar.
  4. The detainee traveled to another training camp near Jalalabad, Afghanistan, after Al-Farouq, but the training was cancelled due to the war.
  5. The detainee was captured near the Pakistan border.


Administrative Review Board hearing

Detainees who were determined to have been properly classified as "enemy combatants" were scheduled to have their dossier reviewed at annual Administrative Review Board hearings. The Administrative Review Boards weren't authorized to review whether a detainee qualified for POW status, and they weren't authorized to review whether a detainee should have been classified as an "enemy combatant".

They were authorized to consider whether a detainee should continue to be detained by the United States, because they continued to pose a threat—or whether they could safely be repatriated to the custody of their home country, or whether they could be set free.

The factors for and against continuing to detain Abdullah Al Tayabi were among the 121 that the Department of Defense released on March 3, 2006.[3]

The following primary factors favor continued detention:

a. Commitment
  1. The detainee, a Saudi Arabian citizen, voluntarily traveled from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to Afghanistan via Dubai, UAE and Karachi, Pakistan, in August 2001.
  2. The detainee was captured near the Pakistan border.
b. Training
  1. The detainee received weapons training at the al Farouq Training Camp.
  2. The detainee received familiarization with the Kalishnikov rifle and a pistol at a house in which he stayed in Kandahar.
  3. The detainee traveled to another training camp near Jalalabad, Afghanistan, after al Farouq, but the training was cancelled due to the war.
c. Connection / Association
  1. The detainee's name was on a list of captured mujahidin found on a hard drive associated with a senior al Qaida member.
  2. The detainee's name was on a list of al Qaida Mujahidin and the contents of their "trust" accounts found on computer media recovered during raids against al Qaida associated safe houses.
  3. The detainee joined Abu Thabet's group that was crossing the mountains heading for the Pakistani border.
  4. Abu Thabit fought for the al Qaida terrorist organization. 4.


The following primary factors favor release or transfer:

a. The detainee stated that after he was captured, he was forced to admit to things that were not true. He is not associated with al Qaida.
b. The detainee stated that he never went to al Farouq training camp. He stated that his statements were made due to pressure from the Afghani's. September 11 happened about two weeks after he was in Afghanistan.
c. The detainee stated he went to Afghanistan during his vacation from school to obtain weapons training. He purchased a return ticket intending to only stay in Afghanistan for a month.
d. The detainee stated he applied to King Fahd military school for training but they refused him because he looked weak. This is why he sought training in Afghanistan.


References

External links

Template:WoTPrisoners

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.